Reviews

The Characters are just priceless!
My children and I loved HipHop and friends. Great morals in the music...5 stars!

  About

We would like to share with you our most recent discovery.

  About The Author

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All for the Children!

 

We love to perform for children and their families. It lets us see through a fresh, young set of eyes the impact our music and books have on these young minds. We are available for birthday parties, school functions and just about any of your entertainment needs. We offer our service for free as part of our non-profit. See contact page for booking and we will let you know when we are available.

HipHop & Friends was created by Lawrence Engerman Jr. He has always had a passion for writing music and in 1998 released his first album "The King Is Here." In 2006 he released his second album "Already Famous," selling over 2000 units independently. His love for producing and writing along with being a single parent motivated him to start writing children's books. And in 2012 he wrote and illustrated his first children's book "Many Shoes! Too Many to Choose!" The book incorporates his love for the hiphop genre by each page rhyming melodically. His second book , "I CAN! I CAN'T,"was written shortly after and inspired by his oldest daughter who was born with Cerebral Palsy. His illustrations help tell the story in an unconventional way using metaphors. Lawrence has taken a wonderful and creative approach at entertaining young minds with his books and brand of entertainment.

HIPHOP & FRIENDS

 Events

We are passionate about giving back to the children through music and literature. We have an innovative way of distributing our books to children. To engage these children to want to read, we package our books in gift rap and have the characters giving them to the kids. It's statistically proven children are more engaged when they see the character of their book or cartoon come to life. Now they get to interact with the character who gave them their present(book).It's sometimes the small things like this that will have the biggest impact.  

  Facts about Literacy

Youngstar/ Children's talent show
We are currently raising money for our next children's talent show. Please support our efforts to bring literature and entertainment to young people across america.

 After you learn something, Do Something! Find out how to take action here.  

 

2/3 of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of 4th grade will end up in jail or on welfare. Over 70% of America’s inmates cannot read above a 4th grade level.[1]

1 in 4 children in America grow up without learning how to read.[2]

Students who don't read proficiently by the 3rd grade are 4 times likelier to drop out of school. Start a badass book club to keep your peers reading. Sign up for Banned Books Club.[3]

As of 2011, America was the only free-market OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) country where the current generation was less educated than the previous one.[4]

Nearly 85% of the juveniles who face trial in the juvenile court system are functionally illiterate, proving that there is a close relationship between illiteracy and crime. More than 60% of all inmates are functionally illiterate.[5]

53% of 4th graders admitted to reading recreationally “almost every day,” while only 20% of 8th graders could say the same.[6]

75% of Americans who receive food stamps perform at the lowest 2 levels of literacy, and 90% of high school dropouts are on welfare.[7]

Teenage girls between the ages of 16 to 19 who live at or below the poverty line and have below average literacy skills are 6 times more likely to have children out of wedlock than girls their age who can read proficiently.[8]

Reports show that the rate of low literacy in the United States directly costs the healthcare industry over $70 million every year.[9]

In 2013, Washington, D.C. was ranked the most literate American city for the third year in a row, with Seattle and Minneapolis close behind.[10]

Long Beach, CA was ranked the country’s most illiterate city, followed by Mesa, AZ, and Aurora, CO.[11]